About ‘obsesivcreativ’

Rupert Brooke poet

Hand and machine embroidered portrait of war poet Rupert Brooke

Louise is a Newcastle based textile and three dimensional artist making unique pieces, working with traditional north east techniques such as hooky and proggy matting, as well as spinning, quilting, patchwork, embroidery, felting, batik as well as upholstery and lino print.

William Morris

Hand and machine embroidered portrait of war poet Rupert Brooke

Louise is particularly influenced by nature and environmental issues. Inspiration and influences include the Arts and Crafts movement, costume of all eras (but particularly military, late C20 and theatrical), contemporary quilting and fibre arts in the US, subversive crafting and textiles.

AWAS chair 1

Hand and machine embroidered portrait of war poet Rupert Brooke

A constant maker, Louise sources materials from across the country. She is keen to react against mass production and uniformity.

Recently, Louise was very pleased to be involved in the exhibition of Grayson Perry’s ‘A Vanity of Small Differences’ at Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens. Louise worked with local community groups to create three large textile wall hangings in response to his work, these hung alongside the exhibition.

'The First Aspirational Tea Party' made with young mums for Grayson Perry's  'The Vanity of Small Differences' exhibition in Sunderland.

‘The First Aspirational Tea Party’ made with young mums for Grayson Perry’s ‘The Vanity of Small Differences’ exhibition in Sunderland.

Louise believes that passing on skills is very important and welcomes commissions involving school and community work, teaching textile crafts in formal and informal settings.

'All We Are Saying' blanket for Peace.

‘All We Are Saying’ blanket for Peace.

This year, with her family, Louise is heading to Sweden for a two week artists residency at the Bergby Konstcenter. The underlying theme for her residency is about the environment and she have come up with the working title of ‘Häxors Trosor’ for the residency. This is Swedish for ‘Witches Knickers’! This is a humorous term for the shreds of plastic bags stuck in trees and bushes which are such a common sight in our landscapes.  These are symbol of the sad condition of our planet, much of which is a result of a throw-away culture, with rubbish found dumped in beautiful landscapes, plastic floating in the seas and chemicals seeping into the planet’s ecosystems. Watch how the project develops here and on instagram.

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Grayson Perry’s ‘House for Essex’.

A couple of weeks ago, during the Whit week and the school holiday, we all went to visit Grandma and Granddad down in beautiful Suffolk. Having seen the Channel 4 programme the week before about Grayson Perry’s new work, a collaboration with FAT architects, called a ‘House for Essex’, we decided to go and visit it.

Tantalising glimpse of 'House for Essex' across the fields.

Tantalising glimpse of ‘House for Essex’ across the fields.

The house is built in a small Essex village called Wrabness, which is near the banks of the River Stour and a nature reserve.

Getting closer!

Getting closer!

To get near to the house, you can either walk from the local railway station (the best route for those who are unable to walk far or are unsteady on their feet) or like we did and many others, take a slightly longer walk but much more scenic and fun, by walking down the public footpath near to the historic and beautiful All Saint’s Church. The church itself is worth a look at too, it was built in the 1100’s with a separate bell ‘cage’ built after the bell tower collapsed.

Two excited and inspired children!

Two excited and inspired children!

One of my daughters had already seen the Channel 4 programme about how the house was designed and built, so she was super excited as we walked along near the nature reserve catching tantalising glimpses of the house as we walked along the footpaths.

Side view of house.

Side view of house.

With us, were other people making their way to the house, coming from different directions. It was a little bit like a scene in ‘Close Encounters’, when people were drawn to the hill ‘Devil’s Tower’ not knowing why and having no control over their actions – they just had to go.

House for Essex, details of tiles.

House for Essex, details of tiles.

House for Essex, details of tiles.

House for Essex, details of tiles.

The design and detail for the outside of the house is stunning. It also amazed me how wonderfully it sits in the landscape, being such a rural area. The gold roof, sitting beautifully above the trees.

House for Essex, roof detail.

House for Essex, roof detail.

During the Summer, there is an opportunity to stay in the house, for a large fee, of course. As a textile artist, I feel I would love to stay there during the Winter, using Grayson Perry’s interior tapestries and decoration, as inspiration only leaving the building to collect food, walk down to the nature reserve and observe the cranes at the docks of Harwich and Felixstowe. Plus, there would be less people – like us! – peering in at the fabulous house!

House for Essex, viewed from the road leading to the railway station.

House for Essex, viewed from the road leading to the railway station.

Having been lucky enough to visit Grayson Perry’s ‘House for Essex’, with a young family, I would fully recommend it to anyone in the area to go and visit it. I also urge the people of Wrabness to get postcards made, the café open and enjoy this wonderful opportunity to celebrate having a major artwork on their doorstep.